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Friday, February 6, 2015

PTSD B.S.

                                                             Conservative Tribune
The murder of “American Sniper” author Chris Kyle is getting even more attention now that the movie adaptation of his best-selling memoir has become one of the biggest hits of the year.
Now, as his murderer is about to go on trial, shocking information about his motives may shed new light on the case.

According to an organization known as the Warfighter Foundation, there are two discomforting facts that the group uncovered in their investigation of Eddie Ray Routh, Kyle’s killer: he likely didn’t suffer from PTSD and he may have been a sympathizer of Islamist organizations.
The information, which came from a Freedom of Information Act request from by group, states that “During a phone call with his father, Routh expressed sympathy for the detainees and discontent over how the U.S. was conducting the war as well as his reluctance to engage in combat.”
“While working as a guard at Balad Air Base, Routh laments his (Muslim) prisoners’ poor living conditions,” the report also reads.
There is, one must point out, no evidence that Routh had converted to Islam, merely information suggesting that he may have sympathized with the Islamist organizations to which his prisoners belonged (H/T Allen West).
As for his post-traumatic stress disorder, the Warfighter Foundation points out that Routh’s experiences in the military made such a diagnosis unlikely.
“Eddie Routh served one tour in Iraq in 2007, at Balad Air Base (the 2nd largest U.S. installation in Iraq), with no significant events. No combat experience,” the organization said.
“Let me say that again, he NEVER SAW COMBAT or any aspect of traumatic events associated with a combat deployment (i.e. incoming mortar or rocket fire). He never left the base, EVER.”
And the base he was stationed at wasn’t exactly a spartan experience: “Balad Air Base had a Pizza Hut, 24 hour Burger King, Subway, Popeye’s, Baskin Robbins, movie theater, and even a miniature golf course. It even had a strictly enforced 10 mile per hour speed limit!”
I understand eating at Pizza Hut isn’t the most pleasant experience in the world, but it hardly qualifies as traumatic.
While Routh had been experiencing deteriorating mental health, his PTSD had been self-diagnosed — and as everyone who’s ever been in an Internet chat room knows, self-diagnosis isn’t exactly the most reliable form of medical attention.
While it’s unknown whether or not Routh’s possible Islamist sympathies had anything to do with his targeting of Kyle, it’s certainly as plausible of a theory as self-diagnosed PTSD.
However, PTSD fits a convenient media narrative about the privations and savagery of military life during the Bush administration, whereas possible Islamist sympathies sounds politically incorrect.
So if you’re wondering why you hear one and not the other, well, there you go.
“Eddie Routh served one tour in Iraq in 2007, at Balad Air Base (the 2nd largest U.S. installation in Iraq), with no significant events. No combat experience,” the organization said.
“Let me say that again, he NEVER SAW COMBAT or any aspect of traumatic events associated with a combat deployment (i.e. incoming mortar or rocket fire). He never left the base, EVER.”
And the base he was stationed at wasn’t exactly a spartan experience: “Balad Air Base had a Pizza Hut, 24 hour Burger King, Subway, Popeye’s, Baskin Robbins, movie theater, and even a miniature golf course. It even had a strictly enforced 10 mile per hour speed limit!”
I understand eating at Pizza Hut isn’t the most pleasant experience in the world, but it hardly qualifies as traumatic.
While Routh had been experiencing deteriorating mental health, his PTSD had been self-diagnosed — and as everyone who’s ever been in an Internet chat room knows, self-diagnosis isn’t exactly the most reliable form of medical attention.
While it’s unknown whether or not Routh’s possible Islamist sympathies had anything to do with his targeting of Kyle, it’s certainly as plausible of a theory as self-diagnosed PTSD.
However, PTSD fits a convenient media narrative about the privations and savagery of military life during the Bush administration, whereas possible Islamist sympathies sounds politically incorrect.
So if you’re wondering why you hear one and not the other, well, there you go.

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